Episode 44: Red Scarf Girl Part II-Party vs. Family

As Ji-Li Jiang describes in "Red Scarf Girl," the Cultural Revolution became more sinister over time and the psychological pressure on Ji-Li to conform became greater. When the humiliations, beatings, and deaths started hitting close to home, Mao Zedong's ultimate loyalty test was given to millions of children in China: Party or family?  

This is the second and final part in a series on Ji-Li Jiang's experience during the Cultural Revolution.

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Episode 43: Red Scarf Girl Part I-Destroying the Four Olds

Kids often get overlooked in traditional historical narratives. But in China around 1966, the communist leader Mao Zedong realized that he could weaponize the youth of China to achieve his political goals. The result was disastrously tragic. In her memoir "Red Scarf Girl," Ji-li Jiang tells the horrifying story of the Cultural Revolution through the eyes of a young adult.

This is Part I in a series on Ji-Li Jiang's experience during the Cultural Revolution. Part II should be out in a few weeks. 

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Episode 42: Where the World Ended-History and Identity in East Germany

What is it that makes you, you? How would your identity change if you suddenly belonged to a new country? For the people of East Germany, this hypothetical became a reality shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War in the early 1990's. In her book "Where the World Ended," Daphne Berdahl takes a look at the complex interaction between history and identity. 

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Episode 41: Where the World Ended-Secrets, Politics, and Religion in East Germany

The end of the Cold War is often simplified to the triumph of democracy and capitalism over communism. But what impact did this triumph have on the everyday people involved? Shortly after the fall of the Berlin wall and the re-unification of Germany, anthropologist Daphne Berdahl traveled to the East German village of Kella to find out. Based on her insight, this episode takes a look at everyday life from a political and social perspective under the authoritarian regime. How much control did the state have over the political and social life of it's citizens? Was their any room for dissent? What role did religion play? How did all of this change once the borders were opened and Germany was reunified? 

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Episode 40: The Tao of Pooh- Taoism in the Modern World

Picking up where the last episode left off, this episode looks at some of the core principles and wisdom contained in "The Tao of Pooh." The Taoist concepts of inner nature, yin and yang, wu wei, the uncarved block, simplicity, patience, and compassion are all discussed. It is difficult to read the book and not come away thinking that Taoism is an underrated and useful philosophy in modern times. 

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Episode 39: The Tao of Pooh-The State of Education and Context

Written in 1982 by Benjamin Hoff, "The Tao of Pooh" gives an overview of the ancient philosophy of Taoism. The book is accessible and full of wisdom, but perhaps its most useful element is how it sheds light on the concerning trends in the modern education system. Intellectual curiosity and the search for meaning seem to be taking a backseat to practicality and career readiness.

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Episode 38: The Bystander Effect During the Holocaust

The Bystander Effect is a psychological term for the tendency for people to be less likely to help victims in need when other people are present. During the Holocaust, a significant number of people around the globe knew about the mass murders, deportations, and concentration camps, and yet did nothing to help the victims. Why? What made people more (or less) likely to step up and help?

You can check out materials from Facing History on this subject here.

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Episode 37: World War I-1919-Final Tally and Treaty of Versailles

The fighting may have ended in 1918, but the Treaty of Versailles negotiations in 1919 may have been just as important. Woodrow Wilson’s noble ideas like “self determination” and “fair and lasting peace” didn’t amount to much as the Allied powers sought mainly to punish Germany. A continued naval blockade, the war guilt clause, reparations, and exclusion from the League of Nations helped put Europe on the path to World War II. 

Scene from “Rome” on HBO: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9SFsAqqN7fU

For more on how the Treaty of Versailles and other factors contributed to the rise of Hitler and Nazi Germany, check out Episode 20

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Episode 36: World War I-1918-Desperate Times

As the rest of their alliance crumbled around them, Germany kicked off 1918 with Operation Michael-the first in a series of huge offensives designed to win the war. Desperate times call for desperate measures, but in the end exhaustion and futility ruled the day. The offensives backfired and resulted in a decisive military victory for the Allies.

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Episode 35: World War I-1917-Exhaustion and Demoralization

Of all the crazy years during the Great War, 1917 was probably the most eventful. The Russian Revolution, Unrestricted Submarine Warfare, the Zimmerman Telegram, Woodrow Wilson and the United States entering the war, the Nivelle Offensive, and Passchendaele are just some of the momentous events. It can be difficult to make sense of it all without an understanding of one of the key themes of 1917- the increasingly demoralizing impact of World War I on soldiers, civilians, and governments. 

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Episode 34: Fake News and Propaganda During World War I

Fake News and propaganda have been around as long as civilization itself. The modern epidemic of lies and deception as a means to influence public opinion can draw some interesting parallels to World War I. What can we learn from the efforts of both governments and private citizens to control the narrative of war?

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Episode 33: World War I-1916-Death Trap

In 1916, World War I continued to corrupt and destroy everything it came into contact with. The rates of death and destruction at Verdun and the Somme were unlike anything ever seen before. Soldiers, governments, and civilians were decimated by the tragedy and the "lost generation" was born.

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Episode 32: World War I-1915-Horror Show

During 1915, it was apparent that World War I was becoming something truly malevolent. With the carnage and the devastation continuing on the Western and Eastern Front, new innovations and tactics had to be used in order to have any measure of success. With the horror show continuing to get worse, political and military leaders took part in a "search for elsewhere" looking for any other strategy that might work. As a result, 1915 managed to add the Gallipoli Campaign and the Armenian Genocide to an already horrifying list of tragedies during the Great War.  

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Episode 31: World War I-1914-Destroyed But Not Defeated

The first year of World War I set the tone for the rest of the war. Violence, brutality, and chaos ruled the day as huge armies clashed in what many see as the first truly modern war. But could things have turned out differently? Should the Germans have won the war in 1914? What role did poor leadership play in the disaster that was to come? Why did the war become a self-perpetuating tragedy? This episode will look at questions like this and some of the other human themes that become apparent when you look at the first year of World War I. 

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Episode 30: The Causes of World War I-Spreading the Blame

It is amazing how misinformed the general public is regarding the origins of World War I. Even historians debate the causes of the Great War. Who or what is to blame for one of the greatest tragedies in history? Like most things that are complicated and nuanced, it turns out there is a mix of factors that led Europe down a path of terrible destruction.

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Episode 29: All Quiet on the Western Front

"Terror can be endured so long as a man simply ducks; but it kills, if a man thinks about it." Published by Erich Maria Remarque in 1929, "All Quiet on the Western Front" is one of the most important war novels of all time. This episode is a discussion of the novel and some of the themes it portrays, such as war, dehumanization, and the lost generation. 

Link to Paul Bloom's alternative take on Dehumanization as discussed around 17:40 mark: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/11/27/the-root-of-all-cruelty (Link)

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Episode 28: Christmas in the Trenches

The Great War has it's share of amazing stories, but the Christmas Truce of 1914 stands out as one of the greatest. In a spontaneous outburst of humanity, soldiers on the Western Front put down their weapons and met the enemy in no-man's-land to exchange drinks and cigars, sing carols, and take a break from killing each other. But what did it all mean? Was this an example of moral goodness shining through in the darkest moments of World War I, or simply something much more practical?

Much of the material and first hand accounts from this episode come from Peter Hart's book "Fire and Movement."

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Episode 27: The Amistad Rebellion-Going Home

Fighting against historic odds, 53 slaves aboard "La Amistad" decided to take fate in their own hands. In an epic struggle of violence, politics, and public opinion, the Amistad Africans overcame incredible adversity to do the one thing they wanted more than anything else-go home.

This is Part II and the conclusion of a two-part series on the Amistad Slave Rebellion. It deals with the rebellion itself, the Amistad Africans battle through the American justice system and the Supreme Court, as well as their journey home.    

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Episode 26: The Amistad Rebellion-Origins and Middle Passage

Historians estimate that 12.5 million African slaves were transported across the Atlantic Ocean from the 1500's into the early 1800's. Millions would die due to the horrible and dehumanizing conditions of the Middle Passage. But in July of 1839, slaves aboard "La Amistad" slave ship overthrew their captors and changed history forever.

This is Part I in a multi-part series on the Amistad Slave Rebellion. It deals primarily with the origins of the Amistad slaves and their journey into slavery and across the Middle Passage. Future episodes will look at the revolt itself and the slaves' struggle to regain freedom in the courtroom.   

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Episode 25: The Clash of Civilizations

What will be the main source of world conflict in the future? According to political scientist Samuel Huntington, the globe will be engulfed in a struggle of cultural identity called the Clash of Civilizations. What role does belief, identity, and the dangerous "us vs. them" mentality play in world events?

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